About sugar and starch

Plant & zo

The science of plants and more


About sugar and starch

Just like us plants don’t like a lack of energy. During the day plants get their energy from sunlight and CO2. To prevent running out of energy during the night, plants turn part of that energy into starch. When there is not enough or no sunlight, plants breakdown this starch into energy. This happens during the night. But also, during twilight, or on a very overcast day. Researchers from Germany found out how plants decide to breakdown starch.

Using a computer simulation, the researchers predicted for different situations the breakdown of starch. In the simulation, the breakdown of starch was dependent on the amount of starch available and the time to dawn. The predicted outcomes were compared with the observed results in real life. For one of the situations there was a difference in outcome between the prediction and observations. This gave a lead in the search how starch breakdown is regulated.

In this situation, the researchers placed the plants from a normal day-night rhythm into a space with intense light for 24 hours a day. The simulation predicted that even though there was no night, the plants will breakdown starch in the second half of the expected night. In real life plants did not do that. There was no starch breakdown. This contrasted with plants standing for 24 hour a day in low light, like twilight, then plants do breakdown starch in the second half of the expected night. Indicating that there is something that prevents the breakdown of starch when there is enough light.

This signal can come directly from the received amount of light. Or it can be an indirect signal, like for example the amount of available sugar. To decipher between these two, the researchers analysed what happened with plants that got less light in the afternoon. This they compared with  plants that got enough light in the afternoon, but not enough CO2. In both situations plants make less sugars. And as the researchers noticed, in both cases they broke down more starch. Showing that the signal is coming from the sugars and not the light.

Sugar, thus, prevents the breakdown of starch. A reduction in the availability of sugar, like during a very cloudy day or during twilight, enables the breakdown of starch. Necessary even, to prevent an abrupt dip in energy. Allowing plants to keep going, even on a rainy day.

Literature

Hirofumi Ishihara, Saleh Alseekh, Regina Feil, Pumi Perera, Gavin M George, Piotr Niedźwiecki, Stephanie Arrivault, Samuel C Zeeman, Alisdair R Fernie, John E Lunn, Alison M Smith, Mark Stitt (2022) Rising rates of starch degradation during daytime and trehalose 6-phosphate optimize carbon availability. Plant Physiology, kiac162, https://doi.org/10.1093/plphys/kiac162


Do you want to read more about how plants calculate how much starch they can use? Go to Calculating plants

Over suiker en zetmeel

Plant & zo

Plantenwetenschap en meer


Over suiker en zetmeel

Net als wij houden planten niet van een gebrek aan energie. Overdag halen planten hun energie uit zonlicht en CO2. Om te voorkomen dat ze s’ nachts zonder energie zitten, slaan ze een gedeelte van deze energie op als zetmeel. Dit zetmeel breken de planten weer af wanneer er geen, of niet genoeg zonlicht is om energie uit te halen. Dit gebeurt dus s’ nachts. Maar ook tijdens de schemering, of een erg bewolkte dag. Onderzoekers uit Duitsland zochten uit hoe planten beslissen om dit zetmeel te gaan gebruiken.

Met een computersimulatie voorspelde de onderzoekers voor verschillende situaties de afbraak van zetmeel. In deze simulatie was de snelheid van de afbraak van zetmeel afhankelijk is van de beschikbare hoeveelheid zetmeel en de verwachte ochtend. De voorspelde uitkomsten vergeleken ze met wat ze voor elke situatie zagen in de praktijk. In een van de situaties was het resultaat in de praktijk niet gelijk aan de voorspelde uitkomst. Dit gaf een aanknopingspunt in de zoektocht naar wat de zetmeel afbraak reguleert.

In deze situatie hadden de onderzoekers de planten vanuit een normaal dag en nacht ritme s’ ochtends in een ruimte geplaats met 24 uur per dag fel licht. De simulatie voorspelde dat de planten ondanks dat er geen nacht is toch beginnen aan de afbraak van zetmeel, ongeveer haverwege de verwachte nacht. Dit deden de planten echter niet. Er was geen zetmeel afbraak. Wanneer de planten in 24 uur per dag in weinig licht staan, zeg maar in de schemer, dan gaan ze wel halverwege de verwachte nacht beginnen met zetmeel afbraak. Er is dus iets dat het omzetten van zetmeel voorkomt wanneer er genoeg licht is.

Dit signaal kan direct van de ontvangen hoeveelheid licht komen. Maar ook als een indirect signaal, bijvoorbeeld van de hoeveelheid beschikbare suiker. Om dit onderscheid te maken keken de onderzoekers wat er gebeurde met planten die in de middag minder licht kregen. Dit vergeleken ze met planten die in de middag genoeg licht hadden, maar minder CO2. In beide gevallen kunnen de planten dan minder suikers maken. En zoals de onderzoekers zagen braken ze in beiden gevallen ook meer zetmeel af. Het signaal komt dus van de suikers en niet het licht.

Suiker houdt de afbraak van zetmeel dus tegen. Het dalen van de beschikbare hoeveelheid suiker, zoals tijdens een erg bewolkte dag of tijdens de schemering, maakt de afbraak van zetmeel mogelijk. Noodzakelijk zelfs, om een abrupte energie dip te voorkomen. Zo kunnen planten door blijven gaan, zelfs als het niet zo zonnig is.

Literatuur

Hirofumi Ishihara, Saleh Alseekh, Regina Feil, Pumi Perera, Gavin M George, Piotr Niedźwiecki, Stephanie Arrivault, Samuel C Zeeman, Alisdair R Fernie, John E Lunn, Alison M Smith, Mark Stitt (2022) Rising rates of starch degradation during daytime and trehalose 6-phosphate optimize carbon availability. Plant Physiology, kiac162, https://doi.org/10.1093/plphys/kiac162


Wil je meer lezen over hoe planten berekenen hoeveel zetmeel ze kunnen gebruiken? Ga dan naar Rekenende planten.

A glimpse from the past

Plant & zo

The science of plants and more


A glimpse from the past

Photosynthesis, turning CO2 into sugars, that is something plants are good in, or not? True, plants can do this. We even recognise it as one of the major feats of plants. But to say that they can do it extremely well, not really. For plant scientist like to see if they can improve photosynthesis. If they can, they can improve crop yield with it.

Rubisco is the actual enzyme that turns CO2, with help of sunlight, into sugar. The problem is that it is just as likely to use O2 than CO2 in this reaction. Not really effective. This was not always the case. About 2.5 billion years ago, when Rubisco had just turned up, there was hardly any O2, and Rubisco was much more effective. Since then, Rubisco kept adjusting itself to less CO2 and more O2 in the air. However, it slowed Rubisco down. Now the amount of CO2 in the air increases again, Rubisco can no longer benefit from this, it stays slow. American researchers wanted to know, what it is that made the Rubisco from the past faster. And set out to find out how this Rubisco looked.

The researchers started their search by making a family portrait of current Rubisco variants. They narrowed this down to the nightshade plant family. This is the family tomato, aubergine, pepper, potato, and tobacco belong to. And just like you are not an exact copy of your siblings and cousins but do look like them, the Rubisco proteins of the nightshade family are alike but have differences as well.

The next step was to use this information to find out how the common ancestor of the Rubisco protein of the nightshade family looked like. For this the researchers first made a family tree of the nightshade family. Just like you look more like your siblings than your cousins, tomato and aubergine Rubisco look more alike than tobacco Rubisco. Now the researchers could predict how the Rubisco of the common ancestor of tomato and aubergine Rubisco looked like, and subsequently the one from tomato, aubergine, and tobacco. You can compare this with predicting how your parents look using photos from you and your siblings. And for predicting how your grandparents look, by also using the photos of your cousins.

This gave the researchers portraits of 98 possible historic Rubisco proteins. These proteins were tested to check if they indeed functioned as Rubisco proteins. Which they did, and some of them were even quicker that the currently know variants of Rubisco. Which is exciting, as the researchers might be able to use those to give plants a more efficient Rubisco, so they can grow better.

But historic Rubisco had another surprise for the researchers. Normally when they look to what makes an enzyme more or less effective, the researchers look at where the enzymatic reaction takes place. But this is not where the historic Rubisco is different. It turns out, there are more places on the enzyme that influence the reaction. As it turns out, we can still learn from the past.

Literature

Myat T. Lin, Heidi Salihovic, Frances K. Clark, and Maureen R. Hanson (2022) Improving the efficiency of Rubisco by resurrecting its ancestors in the family Solanaceae. Science Advances Vol 8, Issue 15 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abm6871

Een blik uit het verleden

Plant & zo

Plantenwetenschap en meer


Een blik uit het verleden

Fotosynthese, het omzetten van CO2 in suikers, is waar planten goed in zijn, toch? Planten kunnen dit inderdaad. We herkennen het zelfs als een van de belangrijkste prestaties van een plant. Maar dat ze er extreem goed in zijn, nee niet echt. Planten onderzoekers willen graag fotosynthese verbeteren. Om zo de opbrengst van gewassen omhoog te krijgen.

Rubisco, het enzym dat CO2 met behulp van zonlicht omzet in suiker, gebruikt net zo lief O2 als CO2. Niet zo effectief. Dit was niet altijd het geval. Zo’n 2,5 miljard jaar geleden, toen Rubisco nog maar net kwam kijken, was er nog nauwelijks zuurstof in de lucht, Rubisco was toen een stuk effectiever. Sindsdien heeft Rubisco zich steeds een beetje aangepast aan minder CO2 en meer O2 in de lucht. Dit ging echter ten koste van de snelheid waarmee Rubisco CO2 omzet in suikers. Nu de hoeveelheid CO2 in de lucht weer toeneemt kan Rubisco daar niet van profiteren, het blijft langzaam. Amerikaanse onderzoekers wilde weten waarom de Rubisco uit het verleden sneller was. En zochten uit hoe deze historische Rubisco eruit zag.

De onderzoekers begonnen hun zoektocht met het maken van een familieportret van de huidige varianten van Rubisco. Dit portret maakte ze van de nachtschade plantenfamilie. Deze bestaat onder andere uit tomaat, paprika, aubergine, aardappel en tabak. En net zoals jij op je broertjes en zusjes, neefjes en nichtjes lijkt, maar geen exacte copy van ze bent. Lijken de Rubisco eiwitten van de nachtschade familie op elkaar, maar hebben ook verschillen.

De volgende stap was om deze informatie te gebruiken om erachter te komen hoe de Ribisco van de gemeenschappelijke voorouder van de nachtschade familie eruitzag. Om dit te kunnen doen maakte de onderzoekers een stamboom van de nachtschade familie. Net zoals jij meer op je broertjes en zusjes lijkt dan op je neefjes en nichtjes, lijken tomaat en aubergine meer op elkaar dan op tabak. Vervolgens konden de onderzoekers voorspellen hoe de gemeenschappelijke voorouder van tomaat en aubergine eruit heeft kunnen zien, en die van tomaat, aubergine en tabak. Je kan het vergelijken met voorspellen hoe je ouders eruitzien aan de hand van een foto van jouw en je broertjes en zusjes. Om te voorspellen hoe je grootouders eruitzagen heb je vervolgens ook foto’s van je neefjes en nichtjes nodig.

Dit gaf de onderzoekers portretten van 98 mogelijke historische Rubisco eiwitten. Deze testen de onderzoekers om te kijken of ze ook daadwerkelijk CO2 in suikers konden omzetten. Niet alleen bleken ze dit te kunnen, sommige enzymen deden dit nog beter dan de huidige Rubisco. Hiermee is het dus mogelijk planten een efficiëntere Rubisco te geven, en beter te laten groeien.

Daarnaast had de historische Rubisco nog een verassing voor de onderzoekers. Normaal gesproken wanneer onderzoekers uitzoeken waarom een enzym meer of minder effectief is kijken ze naar de plek waar de reactie plaatsvindt. Maar dit is niet de plek de historische Rubisco verschilt met de huidige varianten. Er blijken dus nog andere plaatsen op het enzym te zijn die de reactie beïnvloeden. Het blijkt maar weer eens, we kunnen nog steeds leren van het verleden.

Literatuur

Myat T. Lin, Heidi Salihovic, Frances K. Clark, and Maureen R. Hanson (2022) Improving the efficiency of Rubisco by resurrecting its ancestors in the family Solanaceae. Science Advances Vol 8, Issue 15 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abm6871

%d bloggers like this: