How to stop

Plant & zo

The science of plants and more


How to stop

To grow or not to grow, that is the question. It influences the form of an organ and organism, such as a  plant. Therefore, the question when to start growing and when to stop is an important one. It is also the question that occupies plant root researchers from Germany.

Root growth is divided in several parts organised in different regions along the root. Al the way in the tip of the root are the quickly dividing cells. Because plant cells, due to their cell wall, are connected to each other and not be able to move around, over time the cells get further away from the root tip. How further away from the root tip, how slower the cells divide. Then comes a moment they are too far from the root tip and division stops, and they start stretching. Even further from the root tip they also stop doing that, they are now adult root cells, ready to specialise .

It was already known that accumulation of the hormone auxin in the root tip gets the division in these cells starting. How further away from the root tip, how less influence auxin has on the cell. Cell division slows down. Not only auxin, but also the hormones cytokinin, brassinosteroids and ethylene influence root growth. So, tries cytokinin to reduce the influence of auxin. Cytokinin kind of convinces the cells to stop dividing and start stretching.

Now German researchers found that cytokinin also has a role in stopping this cell stretching. When they added cytokinin to the growth medium, the researchers noticed that the roots stopped sooner with stretching. While in plants, through a mutation, blind for cytokinin the root cells stretched for longer. Is cytokinin calling for the stretching cells to grow up and become adults?

Having a less flexible cell wall is a characteristic of adult root cells. Keeping this in mind the researchers studied the effect of cytokinin on cell wall flexibility. They noticed that when cytokinin was present, the cell wall is stiffening quicker than when there is no cytokinin in the growth medium. It appears that root cells stop stretching because their cell wall becomes less flexible. The researchers did not stop there, they also noticed that root cells from plants that are not able to transport auxin properly actually have a more flexible cell wall, even when cytokinin is present.

Is auxin influencing here the action of cytokinin? Hinders auxin here the stretching effect of cytokinin? Are auxin and cytokinin actually working together to turn growing root cells into adults? Or is there another hormone that is taking charge here? These are questions that still need to be answered. Clear is though, the cell wall needs to stiffen up for a cell to stop growing. How quickly this happens depends on how much cytokinin and auxin is available. But for now, stopping is not so simple as it looks.

Literature

Shanda Liu, Sören Strauss, Milad Adibi, Gabriella Mosca, Saiko Yoshida, Raffaele Dello Ioio, Adam Runions, Tonni Grube Andersen, Guido Grossmann, Peter Huijser, Richard S. Smith, and Miltos Tsiantis (2022) Cytokinin promotes growth cessation in the Arabidopsis root. Current Biology 32, 1–12 doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2022.03.019

Hoe te stoppen

Plant & zo

Plantenwetenschap en meer


Hoe te stoppen

Groeien of niet groeien, dat is de vraag. Het heeft invloed op de vorm van een plant. Dus de vraag wanneer begin ik met groeien en wanneer stop ik is een belangrijke. En dit is ook de vraag die onderzoekers uit Duitsland, die planten wortels bestuderen bezighoudt.

Wortelgroei is opgedeeld in verschillende onderdelen, elk georganiseerd in verschillende regio’s van de wortel. Helemaal in het puntje van de wortel zitten de snel delende cellen. Omdat plantencellen vanwege hun celwand aan elkaar vastzitten, en dus niet van plaats kunnen veranderen, raken deze cellen steeds verder van de worteltip verwijderd. Hoe verder ze van de tip zijn hoe langzamer ze delen. Tot ze zo ver van de tip verwijderd zijn dat ze stoppen met delen en beginnen met het zich uitstrekken. Nog verder van de worteltip verwijderd stoppen de cellen ook met uitstrekken, ze zijn de wortelcellen volwassen en beginnen ze zich te specificeren.

Het was al bekent dat een ophoping van in de tip van de wortel van het hormoon auxin de cellen aanzet tot deling. Met het verder weg van de wortel tip raken verminderd de invloed van auxin op de cel. De cel gaat hierdoor langzamer delen. Naast auxin hebben ook de hormonen cytokinin, brassinosteroïden en ethyleen hebben een vinger in de pap als het gaat om wortel groei. Zo probeert cytokinin de invloed van auxin te verminderen. Cytokinin haalt de cellen als ware over om te stoppen met delen en beginnen met zich uit te strekken.

De Duitse onderzoekers hebben nu ontdekt dat cytokinin ook een rol heeft in het stoppen van dit uitstrekken. Bij aanwezigheid van cytokinin in het groeimedium zagen de onderzoekers dat de cellen in de wortels eerder stopte met zich uit te strekken. Terwijl planten die door een mutatie blind waren voor cytokinin veel langer doorgingen met uitstrekken. Roept cytokinin ook de uitstrekkende cellen op om volwassen te worden?

Een kenmerk van volwassen wortelcellen is dat de celwand minder flexibel is. Met dit in gedachte keken de onderzoekers naar het effect van cytokinin op de flexibiliteit van de celwand. Aanwezigheid van cytokinin in het groei medium zorgt ervoor dat de celwand sneller verstijfd dan bij afwezigheid van cytokinin. Het lijkt er dus op dat wortelcellen stoppen met uitstrekken omdat de celwand verstijft. Wortelcellen van planten die auxin minder goed kunnen opnemen daar en tegen hebben een flexibeler celwand, ook wanneer er cytokinin in het groeimedium zit.

Beinvloed auxin hier de invloed van cytokinin? En werkt auxin het uitstrekkende effect van cytokinin tegen? Werken auxin en cytokinin hier just samen om groeiende wortelcellen volwassen te krijgen? Of is er een ander hormoon dat hier de dienst uit maakt? Dit zijn vragen die nog niet beantwoord zijn. Wel staat vast dat om te stoppen met groeien de celwand van de cel moet verstijven. Hoe snel dit gebeurt is afhankelijk van hoeveel cytokinin en auxin aanwezig is. Maar voor nu, stoppen is dus niet zo simpel als het lijkt.

Literatuur

Shanda Liu, Sören Strauss, Milad Adibi, Gabriella Mosca, Saiko Yoshida, Raffaele Dello Ioio, Adam Runions, Tonni Grube Andersen, Guido Grossmann, Peter Huijser, Richard S. Smith, and Miltos Tsiantis (2022) Cytokinin promotes growth cessation in the Arabidopsis root. Current Biology 32, 1–12 doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2022.03.019

Calculating plants

Plant & zo

The science of plants and more


Calculating plants

Plants are cool. Just that they can convert sunlight into sugar should justify this. But plants do so much more. One of the things they can do that I found just astounding is their ability to adjust the speed with which they turn starch into sugar.

Of all the energy plants get from sunlight half of it is stored as starch. Plants use this starch at night, turning it into sugars to use as energy. Plants do this in such a way so that at each point during the night the same amount of energy is available. The speed, with which plants turn starch into sugar depends on the total amount of starch available and the length of the night. A longer night results in a lower speed, while with more starch available the turnover speed increases. Showing that plants can calculate how quickly they can turn starch into sugar.

To show how astounding this is, imagine you have a stock that you need to distribute over a couple of days, so that on every day you have the same amount available. To do this, you need to know how big your stock is, and over how many days you need to distribute it. People can divide those numbers and write down the outcome to help us remember how much of the stock we can use each day. Plants, and specifically plant cells, can’t do that, at least not in a way people do this. They have a different method for making sure they use their supply of starch evenly during the night.

Researchers from England are finding out which method the plant use for this. The first clue they found in plants that miss the protein ESV1. These plants have trouble storing starch. They quickly breakdown the formed starch, even during the day, when there is more than enough sugar. It turned out that the starch in these plants is more accessible, easily reachable for starch breakdown enzymes. Restricting access, making starch less accessible for its breakdown enzymes is thus one requirement to evenly turn starch into sugar during the night.

Recently the researchers found a second clue. This time helped by a mutation in the enzyme beta-amylase 1. Beta-amylase 1 is one of the enzymes that breaks down starch into sugar. The interesting part is that the mutation found in beta-amylase 1 does not change anything about the enzymatic activity. The speed with which it turns starch into sugar has not changed. Nevertheless, plants with the newly found mutation use up their stock in starch quicker.

The researchers think reason why, is that something changed in the interaction between beta-amylase 1 and LSF1, a protein that helps enzymes to find starch. When beta-amylase 1 has the newly found mutation, it appears, that this interaction makes starch better identifiable or accessible. Because in absence of LSF1, plants with the newly found beta-amylase 1 mutation do turn their stock of starch evenly into sugar. Also, in absence of beta-amylase 1 is starch turnover rate normal. Suggesting that the interaction between beta-amylase 1 and LSF1 is regulating the restricted starch access.

How beta-amylase 1 and LSF1 interact, the researchers don’t know yet. Thus, it is also still a mystery what changes in this interaction when the newly found mutation in beta-amylase is present. But this research brings us one step closer to an answer to the question how plants adjust, depending on the situation, the speed of starch turnover. But even without knowing this, it is still astounding that plant can do arithmetic.

Literature

Doreen Feike, Marilyn Pike, Libero Gurrieri, Alexander Graf, Alison M Smith (2022) A dominant mutation in β-AMYLASE1 disrupts nighttime control of starch degradation in Arabidopsis leaves. Plant Physiology, Volume 188, Issue 4, Pages 1979–1992, https://doi.org/10.1093/plphys/kiab603

Doreen Feike, David Seung, Alexander Graf, Sylvain Bischof, Tamaryn Ellick, Mario Coiro, Sebastian Soyk, Simona Eicke, Tabea Mettler-Altmann, Kuan Jen Lu, Martin Trick, Samuel C. Zeeman, Alison M. Smith (2016) The Starch Granule-Associated Protein EARLY STARVATION1 Is Required for the Control of Starch Degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves. The Plant Cell, Volume 28, Issue 6, Pages 1472–1489, https://doi.org/10.1105/tpc.16.00011

Antonio Scialdone, Sam T Mugford, Doreen Feike, Alastair Skeffington, Philippa Borrill, Alexander Graf, Alison M Smith, Martin Howard (2013) Arabidopsis plants perform arithmetic division to prevent starvation at night. eLife 2:e00669 doi: 10.7554/eLife.00669

Rekenende planten

Plant & zo

Plantenwetenschap en meer


Rekenende planten

Planten zijn cool. Op zich is alleen al het omzetten van zonlicht in suiker al reden genoeg hiervoor. Maar planten kunnen zo veel meer dan dat. Een eigenschap van planten die ik echt verbazingwekkend vind is hun vermogen om de snelheid van de omzetting van zetmeel aan te passen.

Van al het zonlicht dat planten omzetten in suiker bewaren planten de helft als zetmeel. Dit zetmeel zetten planten s’ nachts weer om in suikers om te kunnen gebruiken als energie. Dit omzetten van zetmeel gebeurt zo dat gedurende de nacht ongeveer evenveel suiker beschikbaar komt. En de snelheid waarmee dit gebeurt hangt af van de hoeveelheid zetmeel dat beschikbaar is, en van de lengte van de nacht. Is de nacht langer dan gaat de snelheid omlaag, is er meer zetmeel beschikbaar, dan verhoogd de snelheid waarmee suiker vrijkomt. Planten kunnen dus berekenen hoe snel ze s’ nachts zetmeel moeten omzetten in suiker.

Om aan te geven hoe verbazingwekkend dit is, beeld eens in dat je een voorraad over een aantal dagen moet verdelen zodat iedere dag evenveel beschikbaar is. Je moet dus weten hoe groot de voorraad is, en hoeveel dagen je met de voorraad moet doen. Wij mensen kunnen de getallen door elkaar delen, en de uitkomst daarvan opschrijven als geheugensteuntje om te weten hoeveel we elke dag van de voorraad mogen gebruiken. Planten, en meer specifiek plantencellen kunnen dat niet, ten minsten niet zoals wij mensen dat doen. Die hebben dus een andere manier om dit te berekenen.

Onderzoekers uit Engeland zoeken uit hoe de plant dit doet. Een eerste aanwijzing vonden ze in planten die het eiwit ESV1 missen. Deze planten hebben moeite om een zetmeel voorraad aan te leggen, omdat ze gevormde zetmeel makkelijk weer afbreken. Zelfs overdag, wanneer suiker volop aanwezig is zetten deze ESV1 missende planten zetmeel om in suiker. Het zetmeel in deze planten blijkt toegankelijker te zijn opgeborgen, de zetmeel afbrekende enzymen kunnen er dus makkelijker bij. Toegankelijkheid beperken, door zetmeel ontoegankelijker te maken voor afbreekenzymen is dus een vereiste voor het gelijkmatig omzetten van zetmeel in suiker.

Onlangs hebben de onderzoekers een tweede aanwijzing gevonden. Dit keer aan de hand van een mutatie in het enzym bèta-amylase 1. Bèta-amylase 1 is een van de enzymen die zetmeel omzet in suiker. Het interessante aan de gevonden mutatie in bèta-amylase 1 is dat deze niks aan de activiteit van het enzym zelf veranderd. De snelheid van zetmeel in suiker omzetten is nog even groot. Toch gaan planten met de gevonden mutatie sneller door hun zetmeel voorraad heen.

De onderzoekers denken dat het komt omdat er iets veranderd is aan de samenwerking tussen bèta-amylase 1 en LSF1, een eiwit dat enzymen helpt zetmeel te vinden. Wanneer bèta-amylase de gevonden mutatie heeft lijkt deze samenwerking ervoor te zorgen dat zetmeel beter vindbaar of toegankelijk is. Dit blijkt vooral omdat wanneer de gemuteerde bèta-amylase aanwezig is maar LSF1 afwezig planten hun voorraad zetmeel s’ nachts wel gelijkmatig omzetten. Ook bij afwezigheid van bèta-amylase 1 is de zetmeel omzetting in suikers normaal. Dit suggereert dat de samenwerking tussen bèta-amylase 1 en LSF1 de toegang tot zetmeel reguleert.

Hoe de samenwerking tussen bèta-amylase 1 en LSF1 precies gaat weten de onderzoekers nog niet. Het is dus ook nog niet bekend wat er precies veranderd aan die samenwerking wanneer de gevonden mutatie aanwezig in bèta-amylase 1 aanwezig is. Wel brengt deze ontdekking de onderzoekers een stapje dichter bij het antwoord op de vraag hoe planten de snelheid van het omzetten van zetmeel in suiker aanpassen aan de omstandigheden. Maar ook zonder te weten hoe, blijft het verbazingwekkend dat planten kunnen rekenen.

Literatuur

Doreen Feike, Marilyn Pike, Libero Gurrieri, Alexander Graf, Alison M Smith (2022) A dominant mutation in β-AMYLASE1 disrupts nighttime control of starch degradation in Arabidopsis leaves. Plant Physiology, Volume 188, Issue 4, Pages 1979–1992, https://doi.org/10.1093/plphys/kiab603

Doreen Feike, David Seung, Alexander Graf, Sylvain Bischof, Tamaryn Ellick, Mario Coiro, Sebastian Soyk, Simona Eicke, Tabea Mettler-Altmann, Kuan Jen Lu, Martin Trick, Samuel C. Zeeman, Alison M. Smith (2016) The Starch Granule-Associated Protein EARLY STARVATION1 Is Required for the Control of Starch Degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves. The Plant Cell, Volume 28, Issue 6, Pages 1472–1489, https://doi.org/10.1105/tpc.16.00011

Antonio Scialdone, Sam T Mugford, Doreen Feike, Alastair Skeffington, Philippa Borrill, Alexander Graf, Alison M Smith, Martin Howard. (2013) Arabidopsis plants perform arithmetic division to prevent starvation at night. eLife 2:e00669 doi: 10.7554/eLife.00669

%d bloggers like this: